Halloweeeen in Islam

الكاتب : Asgarnia Lord   المشاهدات : 466   الردود : 4    ‏2007-10-08
      مشاركة رقم : 1    ‏2007-10-08
  1. Asgarnia Lord

    Asgarnia Lord عضو

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    It's that time of year again, when those of us in North America and elsewhere face the upcoming "holiday fever." It starts with Halloween, with its ghosts and goblins, and continues thereafter with turkeys, Christmas trees, bunnies, four-leaf clovers, etc. Every year we as Muslims face the same dilemma: How do we handle it? Do we hide out and try to avoid the celebrations, or do we give in and allow our children to participate in some aspects of the fun?

    To make an informed decision, we need to understand the history and traditions of these festivities. Only then can we critically evaluate their role in our lives.

    As Muslims, we have two celebrations each year, 'Eid al-Fitr and 'Eid al-Adha. Our celebrations are based in our faith and our religious way of life. There are some who argue that Halloween, at least, is a cultural holiday, with no religious significance. They question why Muslims would have a problem with a fun, candy-filled day of revelry. To understand the issues that Muslims have with Halloween, we need only look at the origins and history of the holiday. (Many of the traditions have varying theories about their history, so the most reliable explanations are included here. More complete information is available in the references and links cited to the right.)

    Halloween has clear connections with the Eve of Samhain, a celebration marking the beginning of winter as well as the first day of the New Year among ancient pagans (mushrikeen) of the British Isles (2nd century B.C.). On this occasion, it was believed that supernatural forces gathered together -- that the barriers between the supernatural and human worlds were broken. They believed that spirits from other worlds (such as the souls of the dead) were able to visit earth during this time and roam about. At this time, they celebrated a joint festival for the sun god and the lord of the dead. The sun was thanked for the harvest and given moral support for the upcoming battle with winter. In ancient times, the pagans made sacrifices of animals and crops in order to please the gods. They also believed that on October 31st, the lord of the dead gathered all the souls of the people who had died that year. The souls upon death would dwell in the body of an animal, then on this day the lord would announce what form they were to take for the next year.

    When Christianity came to the British Isles, the church tried to take attention away from these pagan rituals by placing a Christian holiday on the same day. The Christian festival, the Feast of All Saints, acknowledges the saints of the Christian faith in much the same way that Samhain had paid tribute to the pagan gods. From an Islamic point of view, they replaced one form of idolatry (shirk) with another.

    The customs of Samhain survived anyway, and eventually became intertwined with the Christian holiday. These traditions were brought to the United States by immigrants from Ireland and Scotland. Some of these customs are:

    Dressing up in costumes: Dressed in disguises and masks, people imitated supernatural beings roaming the earth at that time.

    "Trick or Treating": It is widely believed that during the Feast of All Saints, peasants went from house to house asking for money to buy food for the upcoming feast. Additionally, people dressed in costumes would often play tricks on their neighbors. Blame for the resulting chaos was placed on the "spirits and goblins."

    Images of bats, black cats, etc.: These animals were believed to communicate with the spirits of the dead. Black cats especially were believed to house the souls of witches.

    Games such as bobbing for apples: The ancient pagans used divination techniques to foresee the future. There were various methods of doing this, and many have continued through traditional games, often played at children's parties.

    Jack-O'-Lantern: The Irish brought the Jack-O'-Lantern to America. The tradition is based on the following legend: There once was a man named Jack, who was a stingy man who drank too much. He played a trick on the devil, then made the devil promise not to take his soul. The devil, upset, promised to leave Jack alone. When Jack died, he was turned away from Heaven because he was a stingy, mean drunk. Desperate for a resting place, he went to the devil. The devil also turned him away. "But where can I go?" pleaded Jack. "Back to where you came from," said the devil. The night was dark, so the devil tossed him a lighted coal from the fire of Hell. Jack, who was eating a turnip at the time, placed the coal inside as a lamp to light his way. Since that day, he has traveled the world over with his Jack-O'-Lantern in search of a place to rest. Irish children carved out turnips and potatoes to light the night on Halloween (pumpkins didn't grow in Ireland). When the Irish came to America in great numbers in the 1840's, they found that a pumpkin made an even better lantern, and this "American tradition" came to be.

    What should be clear to Muslims is that all of these traditions are based either in ancient pagan culture, or in Christianity. As Muslims, our celebrations should be ones that honor and uphold our faith and beliefs. How can we worship only Allah, the Creator, if we participate in activities that are based in pagan rituals, divination, and the spirit world? May Allah protect us from such misguidance. So many people participate in these celebrations without even understanding the history and the pagan connections, just because their friends are doing it, their parents did it ("it's a tradition!"), and because "it's fun!" Allah described such people in the Qur'an:

    "When it is said unto them, 'Come to what Allah has revealed, come to the Messenger,' they say, 'Enough for us are the ways we found our fathers following.' What! Even though their fathers were void of knowledge and guidance?" (Qur'an 5:104)

    So what can we do, when our children see others dressed up, eating candy, and going to parties? While it may be tempting to join in, we must be careful to preserve our own traditions and not allow our children to be corrupted by this seemingly "innocent" fun. When tempted, remember the pagan origins of these traditions (astughrifullah), and ask Allah to give you strength. Save the celebration, the fun and games, for our 'Eids. Children can still have their fun, and most importantly, should learn that we only acknowledge holidays that have a religious significance to us as Muslims. Holidays are not just excuses to binge and be reckless. In Islam, our holidays retain their religious importance, while allowing proper time for rejoicing, fun and games.

    Finally, Allah warned us about following in the footsteps of those who discard faith:

    "Has not the time arrived for the believers, that their hearts in all humility should engage in the remembrance of Allah and of the Truth which has been revealed to them? That they should not become like those to whom was given the Book aforetime, but long ages passed over them and their hearts grew hard? For many among them are rebellious transgressors." (Qur'an 57:16)

    May Allah guide us all to the straight path, forgive us our sins, and shower us with His mercy.



    source : Huda (www.about.com)
     
  2.   مشاركة رقم : 2    ‏2007-10-08
  3. shamlan_20

    shamlan_20 قلم ذهبي

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    i;ll have to came back;)


    [​IMG]
     
  4.   مشاركة رقم : 3    ‏2007-10-08
  5. عــاهد

    عــاهد مشرف سابق

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    Thank you very much bro...this article was very informative.

    Its true...when you think about it these traditions that they picked up are very immoral and sinful.
    How can you celebrate the soul of the dead?

    I thank Allah for only giving us two most enjoyable, memorable
    holidays.

    The way to avoid our children from following these actions are to live in a muslim community, tell them what these festivals refer to and explain the differences.

    imagine and recall when one of your parents comes to wake you up to get ready to go to Eid prayer, and when you come back you get your 3eediah or 3asb.
    Those were the best memories.



    salam
     
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  7. Asgarnia Lord

    Asgarnia Lord عضو

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    waiting for you reply
     
  8.   مشاركة رقم : 5    ‏2007-10-09
  9. Asgarnia Lord

    Asgarnia Lord عضو

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    yeah , of course I still remember the day I smeared the chocolate cake on my new shiny clothes

    It was very happy memory

    :D
     

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