Split in Arab League

الكاتب : Munir Almaweri   المشاهدات : 493   الردود : 1    ‏2006-07-21
      مشاركة رقم : 1    ‏2006-07-21
  1. Munir Almaweri

    Munir Almaweri كاتب صحفي

    التسجيل :
    ‏2005-06-12
    المشاركات:
    778
    الإعجاب :
    0
    Split in Arab League

    Several Arab League ministers lashed out violently against one another in Cairo on July 15. Intelligence Online has seen minutes of the meeting.

    Since he was appointed secretary-general of the Arab League in March, 2001, former Egyptian minister Amr Mussa had never taken part in such a stormy meeting than the emergency gathering in Cairo on July 15. According to the minutes of the meeting, Saudi Arabian foreign minister prince Saud al Faysal opened hostilities by angrily denouncing Hezbollah and "those who support it behind the scenes."

    He added: "What sort of resistance are they talking about? The kind that leads to the destruction of Lebanon and suffering of its people. The kind that results in the destruction of infrastructure that we financed?"

    Faysal added: "Such practices (employed by Hezbollah) draw the entire region into war and set it back by 20 years. We cannot accept ..(Hezbollah's)..unilateral decision."

    The Syrian minister, Walid al Mualem, responded by saying: 'Why are we meeting if some among us condemn the Resistance? The Resistance has the fight to defend itself, as do the Lebanese people. Israel doesn't need a pretext to sow death and destruction. I warn you against the grave consequenes of including criticism of Hezbollah and Hamas in official statements by the Arab League."

    Lebanese minister Fawzi Salloukh, a Shi'ite close to Hezbollah, launched himself into a flight of oratory over "fate that has chosen the country of cedar trees (Lebanon) to serve as receptacle for death and horror." He obviously backed his Syrian counterpart, absolving Hezbollah, Iran and Syria of any responsibility in the current emergency.

    Salloukh's tirade enraged Faysal. Banging his fist on the table, he derided "diabolical and nihilist dreams that cannot come true," and added: "A rational policy is based on consensus between all the Arab partners and eschews improvisation and unilateral decisions."

    The Kuwaiti minister, sheikh Mujhammad al Sabbar, intervened to support his Saudi counterpart. Addressing the Syrian minister directly, he stated: "Mualem, we cannot place the helm in the hands of Hamas and Hezbollah. What Arab street are you talking about? That which acclaims Saddam and Zarqawi?"

    Jordanian minister Abdulilah al Khatib backed him up."The Arab street is anarchistic. Its acts do a disservice to the common Arab undertaking."

    Two groups of countries butted heads during the encounter: Saudi Arabia backed by Egypt, Jordan, the United Arab Emirates, Morocco and Kuwait; and Syria supported by Algeria, Sudan, Yemen and Palestine. A third group, consisting of Qatar and Oman, tried to reconcile differences, and was joined in that effort by Egypt after a five hour shouting match
     
  2.   مشاركة رقم : 2    ‏2006-07-21
  3. Munir Almaweri

    Munir Almaweri كاتب صحفي

    التسجيل :
    ‏2005-06-12
    المشاركات:
    778
    الإعجاب :
    0
    Split in Arab League

    Several Arab League ministers lashed out violently against one another in Cairo on July 15. Intelligence Online has seen minutes of the meeting.

    Since he was appointed secretary-general of the Arab League in March, 2001, former Egyptian minister Amr Mussa had never taken part in such a stormy meeting than the emergency gathering in Cairo on July 15. According to the minutes of the meeting, Saudi Arabian foreign minister prince Saud al Faysal opened hostilities by angrily denouncing Hezbollah and "those who support it behind the scenes."

    He added: "What sort of resistance are they talking about? The kind that leads to the destruction of Lebanon and suffering of its people. The kind that results in the destruction of infrastructure that we financed?"

    Faysal added: "Such practices (employed by Hezbollah) draw the entire region into war and set it back by 20 years. We cannot accept ..(Hezbollah's)..unilateral decision."

    The Syrian minister, Walid al Mualem, responded by saying: 'Why are we meeting if some among us condemn the Resistance? The Resistance has the fight to defend itself, as do the Lebanese people. Israel doesn't need a pretext to sow death and destruction. I warn you against the grave consequenes of including criticism of Hezbollah and Hamas in official statements by the Arab League."

    Lebanese minister Fawzi Salloukh, a Shi'ite close to Hezbollah, launched himself into a flight of oratory over "fate that has chosen the country of cedar trees (Lebanon) to serve as receptacle for death and horror." He obviously backed his Syrian counterpart, absolving Hezbollah, Iran and Syria of any responsibility in the current emergency.

    Salloukh's tirade enraged Faysal. Banging his fist on the table, he derided "diabolical and nihilist dreams that cannot come true," and added: "A rational policy is based on consensus between all the Arab partners and eschews improvisation and unilateral decisions."

    The Kuwaiti minister, sheikh Mujhammad al Sabbar, intervened to support his Saudi counterpart. Addressing the Syrian minister directly, he stated: "Mualem, we cannot place the helm in the hands of Hamas and Hezbollah. What Arab street are you talking about? That which acclaims Saddam and Zarqawi?"

    Jordanian minister Abdulilah al Khatib backed him up."The Arab street is anarchistic. Its acts do a disservice to the common Arab undertaking."

    Two groups of countries butted heads during the encounter: Saudi Arabia backed by Egypt, Jordan, the United Arab Emirates, Morocco and Kuwait; and Syria supported by Algeria, Sudan, Yemen and Palestine. A third group, consisting of Qatar and Oman, tried to reconcile differences, and was joined in that effort by Egypt after a five hour shouting match
     

مشاركة هذه الصفحة